March 7, 2012   9 notes
columbiasipa:

Rebuilding After Katrina: Creating an Environmentally Sustainable Port
Like much of the Gulf Coast, Gulfport, Mississippi and its state port (above) were devastated by Hurricane Katrina in 2005. But where there is destruction, there is also opportunity: this was the view of 12 students in SIPA’s MPA program in Environmental Science and Policy. Together, they worked to guide the Port of Gulfport in rebuilding using environmentally, economically, and socially sustainable methods.
The 2011 workshop team comprised Fariya Ali, Peachie Aquino, Jennifer Barbour, Preston Cox, Jin Jin Huang, Joseph Gosselar, Charis Lypiridis, Roberto Leal, Nathan Rudder, Clayton Winter, Anastasia Wright, Hilary Young, and faculty adviser Gail Suchman.
The workshop focused on minimizing the ecological footprint of a 10-mile road connecting the port to the rail and highway systems. The group’s recommendations touched on the fuel used by vehicles, vegetation buffer zones, and the role of the local community.
“I came away understanding what an important issue ports are from an environmental sustainability standpoint,” said Anastasia Wright (MPA ’11). “Even though 90 percent of global trade is conducted by sea, it is still a highly unregulated industry in terms of pollution.”
The students hope the port’s stakeholders will consider their guidelines, even those that are not economically or logistically feasible right now. They believe their recommendations give the Port of Gulfport the potential to be a sustainable Port of the Future.
“We hope the report will be used as an advocacy piece,” say team members Roberto Leal (MPA 11’) and Preston Cox (MPA ‘11). “These recommendations will not only help to construct a better port, but will also include the adjacent low-income Gulfport community in the redevelopment project.”
- Sara Ray

columbiasipa:

Rebuilding After Katrina: Creating an Environmentally Sustainable Port

Like much of the Gulf Coast, Gulfport, Mississippi and its state port (above) were devastated by Hurricane Katrina in 2005. But where there is destruction, there is also opportunity: this was the view of 12 students in SIPA’s MPA program in Environmental Science and Policy. Together, they worked to guide the Port of Gulfport in rebuilding using environmentally, economically, and socially sustainable methods.

The 2011 workshop team comprised Fariya Ali, Peachie Aquino, Jennifer Barbour, Preston Cox, Jin Jin Huang, Joseph Gosselar, Charis Lypiridis, Roberto Leal, Nathan Rudder, Clayton Winter, Anastasia Wright, Hilary Young, and faculty adviser Gail Suchman.

The workshop focused on minimizing the ecological footprint of a 10-mile road connecting the port to the rail and highway systems. The group’s recommendations touched on the fuel used by vehicles, vegetation buffer zones, and the role of the local community.

“I came away understanding what an important issue ports are from an environmental sustainability standpoint,” said Anastasia Wright (MPA ’11). “Even though 90 percent of global trade is conducted by sea, it is still a highly unregulated industry in terms of pollution.”

The students hope the port’s stakeholders will consider their guidelines, even those that are not economically or logistically feasible right now. They believe their recommendations give the Port of Gulfport the potential to be a sustainable Port of the Future.

“We hope the report will be used as an advocacy piece,” say team members Roberto Leal (MPA 11’) and Preston Cox (MPA ‘11). “These recommendations will not only help to construct a better port, but will also include the adjacent low-income Gulfport community in the redevelopment project.”

- Sara Ray

March 7, 2012   84 notes
tuesday-johnson:

ca. 1850-70, [daguerreotype portrait of a Southerner with a knife and a pistol]
via Heritage Auctions

tuesday-johnson:

ca. 1850-70, [daguerreotype portrait of a Southerner with a knife and a pistol]

via Heritage Auctions

March 7, 2012   26 notes

“ I’ve been killing characters my entire career, maybe I’m just a bloody minded bastard, I don’t know, [but] when my characters are in danger, I want you to be afraid to turn the page (and to do that) you need to show right from the beginning that you’re playing for keeps. ”

-George R.R. Martin.

I hope in the near future, I can turn the page to find out someone has taken Prince Viserys Taragaryens, head off. (I don’t like him)

(via walkwhilereading-deactivated201)

March 7, 2012   153 notes
siphotos:

Flyers left wing Scott Hartnell sneaks the game-winning goal past Penguins goalie Marc-Andre Fleury during last night’s game at Wells Fargo Center. (Chris Szagola/Cal Sport Media)
DATER: Penguins and Flyers in Top 10 of this week’s power rankingsHACKEL: The celebration code separates hockey from other sports

siphotos:

Flyers left wing Scott Hartnell sneaks the game-winning goal past Penguins goalie Marc-Andre Fleury during last night’s game at Wells Fargo Center. (Chris Szagola/Cal Sport Media)

DATER: Penguins and Flyers in Top 10 of this week’s power rankings
HACKEL: The celebration code separates hockey from other sports

March 7, 2012   17,923 notes
duedlyfirearms:

i present to you my epic alpha kid group shot 500 hours in mspaint

duedlyfirearms:

i present to you my epic alpha kid group shot 500 hours in mspaint

(Source: shelbycragg)

March 7, 2012   1,131 notes

todaysdocument:

“THIS IS NOT A DRILL”

At 7:55 a.m. December 7, 1941, Japanese bombers and torpedo planes attacked the U.S. Pacific fleet anchored at Pearl Harbor, catapulting the United States into World War II. In less than 2 hours, the U.S. Pacific Fleet was devastated, and more than 3,500 Americans were either killed or wounded.

March 7, 2012   7 notes
March 7, 2012   38 notes
wwnorton:

“The Bacchus is a sophisticated, courtly work of art, calculated to catch the eye then hold it. It is an enigma embodied as a rich store of captivating details. Viewed from a certain perspective, the picture seems ripe with sensuality, bordering on outright lubricity. The barely draped boy might be no more than an elaborately wrapped sexual gift. Does he himself not hint at that possibility, with the suggestive play of his right hand in the knot of black ribbon that binds his clothes?”
Andrew Graham-Dixon, Caravaggio: A Life Sacred And Profane

wwnorton:

“The Bacchus is a sophisticated, courtly work of art, calculated to catch the eye then hold it. It is an enigma embodied as a rich store of captivating details. Viewed from a certain perspective, the picture seems ripe with sensuality, bordering on outright lubricity. The barely draped boy might be no more than an elaborately wrapped sexual gift. Does he himself not hint at that possibility, with the suggestive play of his right hand in the knot of black ribbon that binds his clothes?”

Andrew Graham-Dixon, Caravaggio: A Life Sacred And Profane